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Perching Mechanisms for Flying Robots

We are developing passive graspers that will enable flying robotic rotorcraft such as helicopters and quadrotors to perch like a bird without consuming any energy.

Avian-Inspired Perching Mechanisms

Songbirds perch using a tendon that causes the foot to close when the leg collapses. We have developed graspers inspired by the feet and legs of songbirds that enable flying robotic rotorcraft such as helicopters and quadrotors to perch like a bird. The mechanisms uses only the weight of the robot to maintain the grip on the perch. When the robot lifts off, the feet automatically release.





Sarrus-Linkage Perching Mechanisms

We have developed a new mechanism to accomplish the same passive perching as our avian-inspired design, but which is not bioinspired. Our new mechanism uses a Sarrus linkage, rather than a collapsing leg and tendon, to convert the robot's weight into grip force.

More detail coming soon.

Publications

C. E. Doyle, J. J. Bird, T. A. Isom, J. C. Kallman, D. F. Bareiss, D. J. Dunlop, R. J. King, J. J. Abbott, and M. A. Minor, "An Avian-Inspired Passive Mechanism for Quadrotor Perching," IEEE/ASME Trans. Mechatronics, 18(2):506-517, 2013.
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C. E. Doyle, J. J. Bird, T. A. Isom, C. J. Johnson, J. C. Kallman, J. A. Simpson, R. J. King, J. J. Abbott, and M. A. Minor, "Avian-Inspired Passive Perching Mechanism for Robotic Rotorcraft," IEEE/RSJ Int. Conf. Intelligent Robots and Systems, pp. 4975-4980, 2011.
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Collaborators

This research was done in collaboration with Dr. Mark Minor.

Page last modified on April 18, 2015, at 06:18 AM